PRESS CONFERENCE TO MEET THE FAMILY IN PHILLIP DAVID ANDERSON BRUTAL TUSCALOOSA, AL JAIL DEATH

PRESS CONFERENCE TO MEET THE FAMILY IN PHILLIP DAVID ANDERSON BRUTAL TUSCALOOSA, AL JAIL DEATH

PRESS CONFERENCE – MEET THE FAMILY IN THE MATTER OF PHILLIP DAVID ANDERSON, THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN VETERAN GRANDFATHER LEFT IN JAIL SCREAMING IN PAIN FOR A WEEK AND DIED WHEN TREATMENT FOR HIS ULCER WAS REFUSED IN TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA

               A PRESS CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2016, 4:00 P.M. CENTRAL TIME IN FRONT OF THE FEDERAL COURTHOUSE AT 2005 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD, TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA  35401.  SEVERAL MEMBERS OF THE MEDIA HAVE REQUESTED AN OPPORTUNITY TO MEET AND SPEAK WITH THE VICTIM’S FAMILY IN THIS CASE AND THIS PRESS CONFERENCE WILL PROVIDE THAT OPPORTUNITY.

               A RECAP OF THE CASE IS SET OUT BELOW.  THE CASE NUMBER IN THE U.S. DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHER DISTRICT OF ALABAMA, WESTERN DIVISION, IS 7:16-00843-LSC.

               PLEASE DIRECT ANY INQUIRIES TO DAVID I. SCHOEN, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , CELL:  917-941-7952.  WWW.SCHOENLAWFIRM.COM.

 

                                             SUMMARY OF THE CASE:

               Phillip David Anderson, a U.S. Army veteran, beloved African-American father of 4 and grandfather was driving down the road with his daughter and a friend when they were stopped by police at a random roadblock.  A check of his license turned up a warrant outstanding from years earlier for contempt of court for missing a child support hearing he did not know about. 

               Mr. Anderson was locked up in the Tuscaloosa County, Alabama jail where he was left for a week, with no court appearance scheduled.  He complained of terrible stomach pain.  Each day his pain increased so that he literally could not move and just lay on the ground screaming and writhing in pain, with his stomach completely distended.  He did not eat for 7 days.

               He begged for medical help and other inmates beseeched the jailers and medical staff on his behalf, but to no avail.  The jail staff belittled him and accused him of faking and malingering.  The other inmates continued to help him.  Meanwhile, the jail staff told his family he was fine.

               After 7 days, Mr. Anderson collapsed while inmates helped him into the bathroom.  A jail nurse ordered them to put Mr. Anderson lying down, unconscious, with his face in someone else’s urine, despite the inmate’s protestations.  The staff then took him out of the jail, unconscious, but handcuffed, with no shirt or shoes, in the middle of winter.

               His family met the ambulance at the hospital, where the chief jailer insisted that he was fine.  Within minutes a surgeon met with the family and told them that Mr. Anderson would not make it.  Mr. Anderson died a few minutes later.  He had an ulcer that had perforated, causing his intense pain at the jail and leaving his stomach distended – classic symptoms of a duodenal ulcer that should have been obvious as such to jailers and medical staff.  The poison from the perforation had traveled through his system, killing him.  Had he received just basic medical care for his ulcer at the jail, he would have been fine; but the jail and medical staff refused to give him the necessary treatment, causing him to die.

               Mr. Anderson’s son filed a civil rights lawsuit in federal court in the Northern District of Alabama, Case No. 7:16-cv-00843-LSC on May 23, 2016, seeking damages for Mr. Anderson’s brutal, sadistic, and tragic death and a change in jail procedures so that this never happens to anyone else.  He has sued the Tuscaloosa County Sheriff, jailers, Tuscaloosa County, and the U.S.A. (under the Federal Tort Claims Act) because the medical provider, Whatley, is a federal agency.

Contact David I. Schoen, Attorney at Law at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 334-395-6611 for information.

 
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